Welcome...

Join us every Sunday for our weekly 9:30am service.

We are a community of faith seeking to live out the radical good news of Jesus. We open up our land, buildings and resources in the heart of town with the hope of creating a 'meeting place' for people of diverse cultural backgrounds.

The John Flynn Memorial Uniting Church was built for the people of the outback and was inspired by the life works of the Reverend John Flynn.

Follow this link for our other regular activities and groups.

Congregation

Welcome...

Join us every Sunday for our weekly 9:30am service.

We are a community of faith seeking to live out the radical good news of Jesus. We open up our land, buildings and resources in the heart of town with the hope of creating a 'meeting place' for people of diverse cultural backgrounds.

The John Flynn Memorial Uniting Church was built for the people of the outback and was inspired by the life works of the Reverend John Flynn.

Follow this link for our other regular activities and groups.

Adelaide House

Adelaide House

Adelaide House was designed by John Flynn in 1920 and built by the Australian Inland Mission in 1926. One of the earliest buildings in town, this ‘bush nursing hostel’ offered health services and hospitality to those living in the tiny town of Stuart.

Museum features outback nurses stories, Flynn’s story, Pedal Radio invention and passive outback architectural design.

Anangu Connections

Anangu Connections

The relationship between Christian people in the APY lands and the Uniting Church in Alice Springs goes back more than 80 years. It is founded in the history of the church’s involvement with the Ernabella Mission at Pukatja in the Musgrave ranges of South Australia.

Throughout the Northern Synod, urban congregations have entered into partnership relationships with indigenous congregations in their area. Anangu and other First Nations people attend our services on Sunday morning. Components of our service are in both English and Pitjantjatjara.

Meeting Place

Anangu Connections

The Meeting Place: that is what we hope and dream to be. Our land and buildings are located on the Todd Mall in Alice Springs, and many people pass through or stop by on our lawns each day. It is our vision to help people connect: visitors and locals, across cultures and ages; to be the beating heart of our town. In collaboration with volunteers from across the community we run a drop-in centre, an Op Shop, and the Adelaide House tourist centre. In all of these activities we want to welcome people in a safe and inclusive manner, and play our part in helping revitalise the centre of this wonderful town and region.

Upcoming Events

Recent News

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Easter Service 9:30am

Apr 16, 2017

Happy Easter. Service 9:30am. All welcome!

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Silence is Deafening over Digital Shortwave Radio

Feb 15, 2017

The glaring omission in public discussions following shortwave broadcast termination in Central Australia is a viable alternative, like Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM). DRM is a [&hel

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Dr Steve Bevis reflects on our vision of being a Sanctuary for Travellers

Feb 13, 2017

In this three part series, Steve Bevis reflects on our vision statement as a congregation to be a sanctuary for travellers, a reconciling community, and […]

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Rachel Neary reflects on experiencing God in the hard places

Feb 13, 2017

In late 2016, during Advent, our congregational member Rachel Neary reflected on her experiences working in addressing domestic violence in the NT. In particular, Rachel […]

Read More

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The church does not seek to shore up its own freedom, it lives from the freedom of God in Christ and seeks the freedom of others.

If necessary, it does so from a prison cell.
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"Christ has no body now on earth but yours, no hands but yours, no feet but yours. Yours are the eyes through which Christ's compassion is to look out on the world; yours are the feet with which he is to go about doing good; yours are the hands with which God is to bless people now."
- Teresa of Avila
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We are called to love and take responsibility for our place in creation.
#seasonofcreation
If we, along with the other 500 million people who are members of churches affiliated with the WCC, took just one step to care over the next month the world would be a better place. Live your faith. Live it well, generously and sustainably. Let your discipleship be open to the renewing of all things.
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The Rev. Dr Olav Fykse Tveit, general secretary of the World Council of Churches, invites the WCC's 348 member churches and their more than 500 million members to join with Christians of all traditions and on all continents marking a special time of prayer, reflection and care for Creation between 1 September and 4 October: #SeasonofCreation

History is important. I enjoyed studying it at both school and university. Even now I like to read the odd history book. What a privileged life, I know.

There’s no doubt learning history can be personally transformative as we learn from the past and grow taller by honouring those who came before. And, of course, we do well to be attentive to those who have recently been around the block once or twice, and to seek their wisdom. It is true that we should neither disrespect the achievements of the past, or over-state the failings of those who lived their short lives on this same globe as us. But, for all of this, at least one other thing also needs to said - and I think it would happily be affirmed by many of those who went before if they could speak with us today - it is simply this:

We are not slaves to history.

From our individual lives to the grand sweep of things, from our littlest decisions to how we define words in legal assemblies, we are not enslaved to what has gone before, to the way it was done, to the limits of imagination, seeing and understanding that existed in times past. We can be thankful for the best, and, depending on the personal freedom we enjoy, leave the rest. And we can be respectful of those who want to stay put if they truly believe there is nothing better than what they already know and love. But we can also wisely risk something new. Historical consciousness, in fact, depends on it.

It was moving in this last week to stand in prison - in front of bars, thankfully! - and to hear the heartfelt stories of men who wanted to change. The stories and thoughts of men who wanted to make amends to wives and families. Men who wanted the support of something beyond themselves to make sure that - yes, this time - they would make the change they needed. Often they want to get back to country and away from the pressures that they believe cruelled their chances the last time around. There are too many for whom there is a ‘last time around’. It is always humbling to pray with them. One of the female prisoners in the womens’ section said to me that she had really benefited recently from a prisoner through-care programme run by CAALAS, the local Aboriginal legal aid service. This is the ‘Kunga’ or ‘sisters’ programme that my wife, Miriam, helps to manage. This prisoner said she thought the males in prison needed the same opportunity. That they needed a similar programme to heal and prepare for life on the outside. Her voice was strong and clear. It was strong enough to make me pause and think: will we hear voices like hers, and then act in new ways to change our history? Or will we remain happy enough with the failures we seem to repeat, and the stories we tell ourselves to avoid the pain of a history that has led to this point? History isn’t just for the books, it is made by new ideas. Her voice is ringing in my ears.

There is a signpost outside our church on the Todd Mall. It points in the direction of many places across the globe. It is a fairly typical tourist object, pointing people to cities around the world and letting them know how many kilometres they are from home. In its’ own way it is probably harmless enough. Its presence, however, has sparked a new thought… One of our congregational members - who is a massive history buff and probably knows as much about the history of Central Australia and the outback as anyone - recently asked the church council to consider making a new signpost that would point to local Aboriginal communities and mark the distance to each one. What a lovely idea! One day soon we hope to see that new signpost pointing the way back home, to ngurra, the beloved homes and lands of our first peoples. For many, home is the country where healing can happen, where the past can be faced, and a future dreamed and lived; it is a space of grace. Of course, even out there, there is difficult history to be dealt with and much pain to be recounted; but it is far better to remain connected than not. Here at the Uniting Church and The Meeting Place we yearn to help our first peoples remain connected to country even as they try and create new and culturally-appropriate futures for themselves within contemporary Australia. While -and whenever - they are in Alice Springs we will try and be there to listen and support them in whatever way we can. That is our commitment.

And this is our other commitment:

We will face our history and be open to the risky paths that open up the future.

As always, thank you for your support.

Steve

You can support our work at The Meeting Place:
BSB 634634 (Uniting Financial Services)
Acc 100 039 619 (Alice Springs Uniting Church)
(In the reference put: ASP 18 plus your initial and surname, so we can track deposits).
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Come along to church this Sunday Aug 27th, and hear Miriam Bevis sharing from this week's reading, Exodus 1:8 - 2:10. Hebrew midwives, Pharoah's daughter, Moses' sister, as well as a crew of other inspiring women await. ... See MoreSee Less

Facts & Figures

  • 2,500 Uniting Church congregations across Australia each week
  • 777 Congregation 2016
  • 3120 Sundays since Church opened
  • 1 Number of persons it takes to bring god into your life.